Recliner Rocker Shocker!

I nearly fell off my chair this week. In my recent and fairly exhaustive trawl through over two dozen distros and their variants, I found one I liked a lot. Which maybe isn’t so chair-topplingly surprising, in and of itself.

The real surprise was that the distro in question was (drum roll, please…): Fedora.

And I nearly fell off my chair backwards when I further found that the desktop environment I liked most in the Fedora context was… Gnome.

It’s clean and uncluttered (especially compared to the busy-ness that is the Fedora KDE spin). It is responsive. And once one has discovered Gnome Shell extensions such as Dash-to-Dock; or used Gnome Tweak Tool to add back Maximize and Minimize buttons to the window decorations… it turns out to be quite highly usable and productive.

All of which surprised me a lot: I have been avoiding anything to do with Gnome in general for quite a few years (since the whole Gnome Shell debacle in 2011) and anything to do with Fedora specifically for some more years than that. But both would appear to have made stealthy progress that impresses this particular traveller from foreign lands (i.e., KDE and Manjaro!) no end. Fedora even looks typographically sane these days. Who would have thought that possible, given their cavalier approach to all things font-y in the past?

The one (quite big) black spot is the lack of an extension that allows Gnome’s windows to wobble or a Desktop Cube to spin (there is one for wobbly windows, but it doesn’t work very well). Can I live without wobbly windows? Possibly, given other things the Gnome environment provides (such as Boxes, which potentially means no more VirtualBox or VMware, though it’s by no means a perfect replacement as yet; and -most impressively- excellent integration with cloud services like Google Drive).

In consequence whereof, I think my days of feeling forced to use KDE might be behind me. I have a spare laptop or two that will become guinea pigs in a ‘transition to Fedora’ experiment this week. We’ll see how it goes…

Try it, Sam. Try Fedora.

bluefedora02Fedora 25, the latest release of the Fedora project, was released on 22nd November. Unfortunately, I was busy celebrating Benjamin Britten’s birthday and thus missed the whole thing.

I’d already tested my Bogart script (to help install Oracle 12c on Fedora) with the first beta of the release, so I wasn’t expecting any problems with the eventual production release -and there aren’t any. The thing works as advertised.

Fedora remains one of my ‘bargepole’ distros (as in, “I wouldn’t touch it with a…”), but I know a lot of people that like it for some reason or other, so Bogart is for them!