Finished

Finished! And only three weeks late!

I’m referring to Churchill 1.7, a major overhaul of the Churchill framework and its accompanying documentation, making it work on RHCSL 6.8, for 12c only, with Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c and a complete overhaul of the bootstrap options available when kickstarting O/S installations.

At some point toward the end of January, it morphed into practically a complete re-write… and I thought seriously about calling it quits and declaring it to be version 2.0. But I’ve stuck with the incremental versioning for now. (I’ve been saving version 2 for when I get round to making it work with RHCSL 7.x distros).

I’m finished in another sense, though, too: the contract to purchase a house in Nottingham is ready to sign and it accordingly looks very much as though I’ll be becoming an ex-Aussie (or a re-Englishman, I suppose, depending on your point of view) on or around 6th March. I may not have much time to post much here given the packing, flight-booking, passport-checking, Internet banking, etc etc shenanigans that now ensue. If I can I will, but otherwise I’ll be back online toward the end of March, live from Nottingham 🙂

Churchill Changes

I’ve just published version 1.7 of Churchill. It contains a lot of changes.

The main one is that I’ve removed a few dependencies on .i686 packages. That means the O/S installations can now all take place off the first DVD alone. No second DVD is prompted for, in other words.

This in turn brings about the biggest single benefit of the new release: it works with CentOS 6.8 (and Scientific Linux 6.8, too).

In fact, Churchill 1.7 now reverts to making CentOS 6.8 the default O/S assumed to be in use. (You can still always specify ‘redhat’, ‘sl’ or ‘oel’ if you prefer to use real Red Hat, Scientific Linux or Oracle Enterprise Linux, of course; and you can always specify an earlier distro version if you prefer to stick with (say) 6.3 -though I can’t think why you’d particularly want to).

The other big change is that the bootstrap lines are now trivially easy. Back in 2013 when I first released Churchill, it seemed like a good idea to make it as flexible as possible so that users could specify their own IP addresses and hostnames; but this just made for really lengthy bootstrap lines and confused the heck out of everybody!

So, the simplify brush has been daubed all over Churchill. You now must use the speed keys 1 to 4 as you build your nodes (or you can instead specify their corresponding hostnames). By specifying the speed key or hostname, you automatically define all the pesky details about IP address and interconnect IP address. It makes things a lot simpler and less confusing, I think. It also makes it a bit less flexible… but that’s the price you pay for simplicity. Ask the Gnome developers!

Other changes flow in consequence: the filecopy=y/n parameter is no longer required. If you are building nodes 1 or 3, file copying is assumed to be ‘yes’; if you are building nodes 2 or 4, it’s assumed to be ‘no’. Likewise, there’s no dg=y/n parameter any more: if you are building nodes 1 or 2, it’s assumed to be ‘no’; but build nodes 3 or 4, it’s assumed to be ‘yes’.

It is still possible to say sk=1&rac=n (or hostname=alpher&rac=n), though: that’s if you are building node 1 but want to use it in standalone mode.

As with the previous release (1.6), Churchill only works to build 12c standalone and RAC/Data Guard environments: there is no Oracle 11g support these days.

These are substantial changes and mean Churchill now works in ways quite different from before. That obviously affects the way it is documented. Those documentation changes are being made as I write and should be ‘live’ by the time you read this. Since the old versions of Churchill are kept available on the old site, I’ll keep the original documentation available on that old site too, at least for now.

On this site, however, only the 1.7 version will be available and documented.