Dizwell Informatics

News from Nowhere

The Dizwell Blog

Recliner Rocker Shocker!

I nearly fell off my chair this week. In my recent and fairly exhaustive trawl through over two dozen distros and their variants, I found one I liked a lot. Which maybe isn’t so chair-topplingly surprising, in and of itself.

The real surprise was that the distro in question was (drum roll, please…): Fedora.

And I nearly fell off my chair backwards when I further found that the desktop environment I liked most in the Fedora context was… Gnome.

It’s clean and uncluttered (especially compared to the busy-ness that is the Fedora KDE spin). It is responsive. And once one has discovered Gnome Shell extensions such as Dash-to-Dock; or used Gnome Tweak Tool to add back Maximize and Minimize buttons to the window decorations… it turns out to be quite highly usable and productive.

All of which surprised me a lot: I have been avoiding anything to do with Gnome in general for quite a few years (since the whole Gnome Shell debacle in 2011) and anything to do with Fedora specifically for some more years than that. But both would appear to have made stealthy progress that impresses this particular traveller from foreign lands (i.e., KDE and Manjaro!) no end. Fedora even looks typographically sane these days. Who would have thought that possible, given their cavalier approach to all things font-y in the past?

The one (quite big) black spot is the lack of an extension that allows Gnome’s windows to wobble or a Desktop Cube to spin (there is one for wobbly windows, but it doesn’t work very well). Can I live without wobbly windows? Possibly, given other things the Gnome environment provides (such as Boxes, which potentially means no more VirtualBox or VMware, though it’s by no means a perfect replacement as yet; and -most impressively- excellent integration with cloud services like Google Drive).

In consequence whereof, I think my days of feeling forced to use KDE might be behind me. I have a spare laptop or two that will become guinea pigs in a ‘transition to Fedora’ experiment this week. We’ll see how it goes…

A Universal Pre-Installer

It is the new year, and nearly my birthday. So I thought I would treat myself to a streamlined and modular way of installing Oracle 12c onto practically any Linux distro I fancied.

Say ‘hi’ to Atlas, a single script that shoulders the burden of doing all the preparatory work needed to get Oracle running nicely.

No matter what distro you’re running, you just download Atlas; you chmod it to make it executable, and then you run it. It sorts out everything else after that for you.

Atlas therefore replaces the menagerie of per-distro scripts I developed over the past year (eg, Kirk for CentOS; Mandela for Ubuntu; Mercury for Manjaro and so on). Where those per-distro scripts worked to get 11g installed, I’ll keep them (because Atlas is 12c-only), though I won’t maintain them further. But if the distro-specific script only did 12c, it now disappears: Atlas is its complete functional replacement.

I’ve put together a landing page, explaining what specific distros Atlas has been tested with (at the last count somewhere north of 20) and the details of how it works and how to use it.

Whilst I’ve got the thing working on all distros mentioned on that page, distro-specific documentation will take a bit of time to arrive. That for Debian is already done. The others are coming, hopefully before the week is out.

Recompile with -fPIC

Let me start by wishing a happy New Year to all my readers, complete with fireworks from our local council’s display!

And then let’s swiftly move on to the bad news!

If you are interested in installing Oracle onto non-approved Linux distros, you are very soon going to have to contend with this sort of error message:

/usr/bin/ld: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0/db_1/lib//libpls12.a(pci.o): relocation R_X86_64_32 against `.rodata.str1.4' can not be used when making a shared object; recompile with -fPIC

This will be found in the Oracle installer’s log immediately after the “linking phase” of the Oracle installation starts.

Unfortunately, the error message dialog that appears at this point looks like this:

…and that particular error message has long been familiar from 12.1.0.1 installs on assorted distros. The workarounds then were to add various compilation flags to assorted makefiles.

But in this case, the graphical error dialog deceives: for a start, this is happening on 12.1.0.2, and although the dialog text is the same as back in the 12.1.0.1 days, the underlying cause is completely different. It’s only when you inspect the installActions log do you (eventually!) see the error text I showed above, which tells you that this is no “ordinary” compilation problem.

Welcome to the world of position-independent code.

Putting it as simply as I know how, the basic idea of position-independent code is that it allows execution of code regardless of its absolute memory address. It’s thus a ‘good thing’, on the whole.

Trouble is, if objects within the code you’re trying to compile haven’t themselves been compiled to be position-independent, then you aren’t yourself allowed to compile the code that references them into shared libraries.

As the error message above says, since “pci.o” isn’t position-independent, you can’t compile references to it into the libpls12 library. Note that the error message does not mean that your attempt to compile libpls12 should use fPIC: if it meant that, you could do something about it. No: it’s telling you that pci.o was compiled by Oracle without fPIC. Only if they re-compile that object with the fPIC compiler option switched on would you then be able to compile it into the libpls12 library successfully.

If you’re best mates with Larry, then, perhaps you’ll be able to get him to do the necessary recompilations for you! Mere mortals, however, are stuck with the unhappy fact that vast swathes of the Oracle 12c code-base has not been compiled to be position-independent… and there’s nothing you can do to fix that when your version of gcc insists that it should be.

The problem doesn’t manifest itself on all distros: Ubuntu 16.04, for example, has no problem installing 12c at all (apart from the usual ones associated with not using a supported distro, of course!) But Ubuntu 16.10 does have this fatal problem. Similarly, Debian 8 is fine with Oracle 12c, but Debian 9 (the testing branch, so not yet ready for mainstream release) fails. And whereas Manjaro didn’t have a problem earlier in the year when I first released my mercury pre-installer script, it does now.

This, of course, gives us a clue: there’s clearly some component of these distros which is being upgraded over time so that later releases fail where earlier ones didn’t. So what’s the upgraded component causing all the trouble?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, given that it’s a compilation error that shows you there’s a problem in the first place, it turns out that the gcc compiler is the culprit.

If you do a fresh install of Ubuntu 16.04 (the long-term support version, so still very much current and relevant), whilst making sure NOT to update anything as part of the installation process itself, issuing the command gcc -v will show you that version 5.4.0 is in use. Do the same thing on Ubuntu 16.10, however, and you’ll discover you’re now using gcc version 6.2.0.

A fresh Debian 8.6 install, subjected to an apt-get install gcc command,  ends up running gcc version 4.9.2. The same thing done to a fresh Debian 9 install results in a gcc version of 6.2.1.

Manjaro is a rolling release, of course, so it’s software components are forever being incrementally upgraded: it makes finding out what gcc version was in use at the start of the year rather tricky! So I don’t have hard evidence for the gcc version shift there -but my main desktop is currently reporting version 6.2.1, so I’ll stick my neck out and say that I would lay odds that, had I checked back in January 2016, I think I would have found it to be around version 5.something.

In short, for all three distros currently under my microscope, a shift from gcc 4- or 5-something to 6-something has taken place… and broken Oracle’s installation routine in the process.

It means that all distros will eventually come across this compilation problem as they eventually upgrade their gcc versions. Expect Fedora to keel over in short order, for example, when their version 26 is released next April (assuming they go for a late-release version of gcc 6.something, which I expect they will). No doubt we’ll have all moved on to installing Oracle 12c Release 2 by then, which is probably suitably position-independent throughout… so maybe no-one will ever have to worry about this issue again. But in the meantime… the constantly changing nature of gcc is a problem.

So, what’s to be done if you want Oracle 12c installed on these distros with their fancy new gcc versions? Nothing I could really think of, except to ensure that the old, functional versions of gcc and related development tools are installed …and that can be easier said than done!

On Debian 9 (‘testing’), for example, instead of just saying apt-get install gcc, you need to now say apt-get install gcc-5, which ensures the ‘right’ compiler version is installed, with which the Oracle installer can live. Thus can this screenshot be taken:

…which shows me happily querying the EMP table on 12.1.0.2 whilst demonstrating that I’m running Debian Testing (codenamed “Stretch”). That’s only possible by careful curating of your development tool versions.

The same sort of ‘install old gcc version and make it the default’ trick is required to get 12c running on Ubuntu 16.10 too:

-though I had to specifically install gcc-4.9 rather than “gcc-5”, since the compilation error still arose when ‘gcc-5’ was installed. These things get tricky!

Anyway: there it is. Gcc’s constant version increments create havoc with Oracle 12c installations. Coming to a distro near you, soonish!

Oracular Installatium!

hpglassesIn ancient history, before I finally managed to install Red Hat 6.1 or SuSE 6.2 and long before the new Millenium had dawned, I dabbled with various numbered versions of Mandrake Linux.

It was produced in France and (originally) based on Red Hat, but with a thick veneer of usability and user-friendliness. Unlike Red Hat itself, for example, it installed easily; specifically, it detected hardware like no other distro at the time could. It also looked pretty decent, as far KDE desktops of the period ever looked decent.

The French company ended up merging with Brazil’s Connectiva Linux and became “mandriva”, a name I always hated. They then went to the brink of bankruptcy several times before releasing their last version of Mandriva in 2011. The company was finally wound up last year.

Happily, Mandriva was forked before it breathed its last: Mageia is the heir to the Mandriva legacy. The name means ‘magic’ in Latin.

Having nothing much else to do on an early Sunday evening and in a deep fit of hopeful nostalgia, I gave the latest release of Mageia (version 5.1) a spin. Sadly, I wasn’t too keen on the results: I chose their KDE desktop and that turned out to be old-school KDE 4.something, meaning a pretty clunky experience complete with weird blue glows around active windows!

So then I tried its Gnome flavour: it’s pretty vanilla Gnome 3 as far as I can tell, which means it’s practically unusable.

In desperation, I tried LXDE. It’s supposed to be a very lightweight desktop environment and it’s not one I’ve ever really bothered with as a result… but I must say, it has all the bells and whistles needed to make an attractive desktop experience and I ended up thinking it suited Mageia much better than any other DE I had tried. So that would be my recommendation, I think, if you wanted to give the distro a whirl.

Whichever desktop environment you choose, the software selection is adequate, but a bit dated: Firefox is back at version 45.5 out-of-the-box (the current version is 50.0); LibreOffice is at 4.4.7.2 (current version is 5.2.3) and so on.

In short: it’s not exactly a bad distro, but it’s another of those ‘I wonder why they bother?’ ones.

For old time’s sake, I wondered if Mageia ran Oracle 12c without drama, and it does (no matter what desktop environment you choose): and I therefore decided to throw another of my ‘preinstaller scripts’ together to make repeated installs of 64-bit 12c Enterprise Edition painless on it. (And yes, it’s only 12c and only 64-bit).

Scripts need names, of course. I’ve called this one Potter, since if mageia is Latin for magic, then we’re in need of the name of someone famous in the world of magic who dabbles in a bit of Latin-esque spellery when occasion demands.

As usual, there’s an article containing screenshotted walk-throughs of how to install Mageia in the first place; how then to run the Potter script; and finally how to perform a subsequent Oracle 12c install.

Mmmm… Manjaro

logoI mentioned at the start of the year how much I had enjoyed having a play around with Manjaro Linux -which is essentially ‘Arch Linux done right’.

It has taken me a while (and several different distros en route) but now it is the end of the year, and I’ve given up my daytime job for a few weeks, I finally have some time on my hands… and the inclination to wipe every machine I’ve been using lately!

So, Manjaro is my new desktop distro of choice and I rather recommend it! Accordingly, I’ve put together a new article explaining how I go about ‘polishing’ a fresh Manjaro install so that it does what I need it to do in the way I like it to do it.

If you’ve ever had a desire for the lean, mean and minimalist Arch approach to running Linux, I think you’ll find Manjaro highly desirable!

Try it, Sam. Try Fedora.

bluefedora02Fedora 25, the latest release of the Fedora project, was released on 22nd November. Unfortunately, I was busy celebrating Benjamin Britten’s birthday and thus missed the whole thing.

I’d already tested my Bogart script (to help install Oracle 12c on Fedora) with the first beta of the release, so I wasn’t expecting any problems with the eventual production release -and there aren’t any. The thing works as advertised.

Fedora remains one of my ‘bargepole’ distros (as in, “I wouldn’t touch it with a…”), but I know a lot of people that like it for some reason or other, so Bogart is for them!

My Dear Watson…

I was idly browsing through Distrowatch today and noticed that at Number 5 on their list of popular distros for the past six months was one called Elementary OS.

It’s not one I’ve ever heard of before, but it’s Ubuntu-derived, and I got to wondering (a) what it was like and (b) would it run Oracle?

In regards to question (a)… it’s a fairly weird desktop and I don’t particularly like it. The default browser is Epiphany, which is about as non-mainstream as you can get and sets the tone for much else. Fancy changing the colour theme of the default terminal? Well, you can’t (at least, there’s no obvious place to do it that I could find). Fancy writing a letter? Or doing a quick bit of spreadsheeting? Tough, then… because there’s no default Office suite installed (you can add one, obviously. But the point remains that the distro appears to be lacking much of what you’d expect to be included in a modern Linux distro). Windows are closed by clicking on the left-hand side of their top bar, where most “normal” folk are used to clicking in the top right-hand corner. You can’t minimise windows, either: there’s one button that acts as a generic ‘resizer’. Click once to maximise and click twice to resize back to its previous non-maximised size. If you want actual minimization, you have to right-click the app’s title bar and select that option from the context menu… which doesn’t seem terribly sensible to me.

It’s mostly all remediable, I suppose, but you’re in for a lot of configuration and downloading …and I can’t frankly see why you’d go to the effort.

On the other hand, I found the distro very fast (to start, to reboot, to open apps, to close them). It seemed extremely responsive… but I still don’t think that makes the lack of normality a sensible trade-off, personally.

So it’s not a distro I’m going to be doing much with, albeit after a fairly cursory look at it. (Read this article for lots more screenshots and what seems to me a reasonable overall assessment). But I can see that someone wanting a fast, straightforward distro that doesn’t invite a lot of tinkering, would find a lot in it that pleases. (I can imagine parents finding its interface useful for young kids, for example).

I guess that means I needn’t worry too much about whether Oracle runs on it or not, then: there aren’t going to be too many young kids clamouring for it, after all!

But it does. Its Ubuntu heritage means you can download my Mandela script, and make one alteration to it: change line 122 to read:

if [ "$VERCHECK" != "Description: elementary OS 0.4 Loki" ]; then

(i.e., alter the text that the command lsb_release -d is tested to return). Once that’s done, run the script and reboot …and then proceed as if the distro were actually Ubuntu (as described in this article) and you’ll have 12c Enterprise Edition running on it in no time at all:

virtualbox_holmes_28_11_2016_17_41_10

Anyway: for a bit of fun on a wet Wednesday (or Monday!) afternoon, it’s worth a dabble, but I’m frankly surprised the distro rates as highly as it does on Distrowatch and I wouldn’t be losing sleep over it if you’ve never tried it. 🙂

New openSUSE

opensuse-64-bit-2016-11-19-16-03-09I was a bit busy this week, what with having my second cataract removed and all… so I missed the release of a new version of openSUSE on 16th November.

However, I’ve caught up now and as the thumbnail to the left attests, my quatro script works on the new release just fine to facilitate easy Oracle Enterprise Edition installations.

See the Quatro main page for screen-shotted walk-through details of how to perform the installation.

SQL Server Replication to Oracle 12c

No version of SQL Server supports replicating to Oracle 12c out of the box.

This took us a little by surprise at work, since things had been replicating just fine in our equally-12c test environment. The difference in Production that arose this week, however, was that somebody decided to re-initialise the SQL Server publish-and-subscribe replication in that environment. This caused SQL Server to drop the replication-controlling table from Oracle and to re-create it from scratch -and only at that point does the lack of 12c support reveal itself.

The symptoms are easy to describe: if you check your replication monitor in the SQL Server Management Studio, you’ll see this error (or variations on it):

sqlserverrepl01

The cause of this is also quite easily found. In the SQL Server msdb database (under Programmability > Stored Procedures > System Stored Procedures, if you’re browsing in the Management Studio), you’ll find a procedure called sys.sp_MSrepl_createdatatypemappings. It contains this code snippet:

IF OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.MSdbms_datatype', 'U') IS NULL
 BEGIN
 print 'Creating table MSdbms_datatype'

create table MSdbms_datatype
 (
 datatype_id int NOT NULL IDENTITY,
 dbms_id int NOT NULL,
 type sysname NOT NULL,
 createparams int NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
 CONSTRAINT pk_MSdbms_datatype PRIMARY KEY (datatype_id),
 CONSTRAINT fk_MSdbms_datatype_dbms_id FOREIGN KEY (dbms_id) REFERENCES MSdbms (dbms_id)
 )
 
 exec dbo.sp_MS_marksystemobject 'MSdbms_datatype'

--
 -- Define default dbms data types
 --
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_MSSQLdatatypes 'MSSQLServer'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_DB2datatypes 'DB2'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '8'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '9'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '10'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '11'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_SASdatatypes 'SYBASE'
 END

You’ll note that it’s creating a table to govern the ‘data type mappings’ between SQL Server and various other databases -in other words, and as an example, where SQL Server says ‘INT’ or ‘BIGINT’, Oracle will say ‘NUMBER’. SQL Server needs to be able to translate its data types to those used by ‘foreign’ databases, and this code sets that translation mechanism up.

Unfortuately, you’ll also note that whilst the code goes on to populate this data mapping table with translation entries for Oracle versions 8, 9, 10 and 11… there’s nothing at all for Oracle 12! It’s this lack of a description as to which SQL Server data types should become which Oracle 12c ones that explains replication’s inability to create its MSREPL7 table correctly.

If, despite receiving that earlier error when first attempting to create a new subscription to an Oracle database, you describe the MSREPL7 table that will actually have been created in Oracle, you’ll see this sort of thing:

sqlserverrepl02

Notice all those “INTERVAL DAY(2) TO SECOND(6)” columns? They’re actually supposed to be NUMBER(10) and NUMBER(3) columns. Those BINARY FILE LOB columns are all supposed to be RAW(16), too.

MSREPL7 is the ‘governor’ for SQL Server replication: it records what tables are supposed to be replicating and what transaction they’re up to in the destination (Oracle) database. When the SQL Server source database next wants to send transactions to Oracle, it’s this table which tells it which transactions have already been sent and which have not. So when this ‘governor’ table is screwed up, you won’t get very far with any replication!

As an aside, things are slightly more complicated if you upgrade to 12c from a previously-working 11g. In that case, you’d already have had replication working nicely, even after completing the 12c upgrade process, and thus the MSREPL7 table would have all the right data types and there’d be no impediment to replication continuing to work. The other tables you’re replicating will also already exist in your newly-upgraded 12c database and they’ll have all the right columns too. So they will replicate nicely as well. So, you will think that all is well… because it is!

It’s only when someone decides to reinitialize  replication that it will all go pear-shaped, because it’s only at that point that SQL Server will drop the tables being replicated and attempt to re-create them… with all the wrong data types! When you then attempt to push a number from SQL Server into a column in Oracle that’s been freshly-created as an INTERVAL data type, that’s when sparks will fly.

This is why we didn’t realise that upgrading to 12c would be an issue in our various test environments: no-one had attempted to re-initialize the replication; and with many multi-hundred-million rows to be pushed across into Oracle, it was a fair bet that no-one would be daft enough to do that in Production either! Unfortunately, it turned out that my gambling instincts were wrong on this occasion: someone was daft enough to hit the wrong menu options, and thus the trouble began.

I couldn’t find much about this problem on Google, which was rather surprising (if one major database has trouble replicating to another major database, I would have expected to hear a lot about it by now!)

I did find enough to make me look at the column types in MSREPL7, and notice that all sorts of odd data types were in use. That got me hunting down any references to how SQL Server knows what data type maps to what in Oracle. And finally, that got me to the stored procedure the code from which appears above.

Looking at that code, it’s just begging for an extra line to be added to it, no?! I mean, if it read:

exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '8'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '9'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '10'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '11'
 exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '12'

…then maybe all the troubles would go away, right?

But you can’t just run that sort of thing in the standard SQL Server Management Studio. For this, you need to run it in DAC (or ‘dedicated administrative connection’) mode. To do that, fire up SSMS as normal and connect to your SQL Server instance as normal. Click New Query to start a new query window. Finally, click the ‘change connection’ button, just to the left of the database selector:

sqlserverrepl03

That will pop-up a new dialog box to allow you to make a fresh connection to your SQL Server instance:

sqlserverrepl04

But notice this time that I’ve stuck ADMIN: in front of my usual ‘server name’ connection string. That will connect you in the right ‘god mode’. You can’t really tell anything is different from a non-DAC connection, apart from the ‘admin:’ identifiers scattered all round the SSMS interface if you look in all the right places!

Anyway, once you’ve got a DAC connection, you can type in this lot of SQL and run it:

USE master

GO

exec sys.sp_MSrepl_ORAdatatypes 'Oracle', '12'

GO

exec sys.sp_MSrepl_MSSQL_ORA_datatypemappings @source_dbms = N'MSSQLSERVER', @destination_dbms = N'ORACLE', @destination_version = '12'

GO

If all goes according to plan, you should see this sort of response:

sqlserverrepl05

Once the data types have been created for Oracle 12, drop the MSREPL7 table from your Oracle database and then try re-initializing your replication subscription once again. This time, it should just work:

sqlserverrepl06

That shows you me dropping MSREPL7 in a SQL*Plus window in blue; then I went and re-initialized the replication in SQL Server (which you can’t see me doing). You then see me describing the structure of MSREPL7 in the blue window: notice (a) the table has been re-created despite just being dropped; and (b) it’s been created with NUMBER and RAW data types for its columns, not INTERVALS and BLOBs. The Synchronization Status progress window finally shows that replication transactions were successfully delivered to the Oracle database.

You can also issue the required fixup SQL in the command-line sqlcmd tool. Connect to your database in DAC mode with the “-A” switch:

sqlcmd -S winsql\winsqldb -E -A

The -S takes the form it does here because it describes the server AND the instance to connect to (I use named instances). Hence “winsql” is the server name and “winsqldb” is the instance to connect to running on that server. The -E switch means “use Windows authentication”, because that’s what I do! If you use named users, you’d use the -U switch and specify the username (and the -P switch if you fancied typing his password in clear text on the command line!). The -A switch means, as I’ve mentioned, connect in DAC mode.

Note that DAC mode is only available locally: that is, you have to be working on the actual server that’s hosting the SQL Server instance. If you insist on running the fixup SQL remotely, you can enable remote DAC access by right-clicking the instance in SSMS, clicking Facets, selecting Surface Area Configuration from the drop-down menu and then setting RemoteDacEnabled to True. You also need the SQL Browser service to be running (which you can switch on from the normal services utility, or by running the SQL Server Configuration Manager, clicking the SQL Server Services item and then the SQL Browser item in the right-hand pane (right-click it and click Start).

Incidentally: you may have thought (as I innocently did) that upgrading your SQL Server from (say) 2008 R2 to (say) 2016 would help. All I can tell you is that the code snippet which appears at the top of this piece is as identically 12c-deficient in SQL Server 2016 as it is in any previous version. I found this surprising and completely inexplicable: I’m prepared to forgive SQL Server vintage 2008 for not knowing about Oracle 12c; I find it much harder to understand why SQL Server 2016 is silent on the subject!

So, as far as I know, this trick of manually adding a reference to 12c in DAC mode is the only way to get any version of SQL Server replicating to Oracle at all.

Whether bolting on a ’12’ to the end of a bit of code and running it is actually supported by Microsoft, I can’t say: I’ve looked for any indication it’s a properly-supported technique in all the usual places and turned up nothing either way.

But if you’re replicating SQL Server to Oracle 11g and thinking of upgrading to 12c any time soon, it might be useful to bear in mind that you’re going to need this technique should you ever need to re-initialize your subscriptions 🙂

We interrupt our broadcast…

…to announce that we’ve just sold our house. So it’s bye-bye wallabies and kangas. 🙁

The plan is now to rent a small-ish apartment somewhere nearer the city for a while. In the longer term, we’re planning to buy a house back in the UK: our days in Oz are numbered (simply because we want to travel more -and whereas 8 hours in the air from Heathrow gets you to most of Europe and lots of North America, 8 hours in the air from Sydney gets you to about the edge of Australian airspace).

Moving house is never fun. So expect the blog upkeep to suffer in the meantime. But I’ll do my best to keep things ticking over.