Red Hat 7.4

Red Hat has just released the latest update to its version 7 Enterprise Linux, so we are now up to RHEL 7.4.

Getting hold of it is, of course, rather more hard work than it would be for most distros, since Red Hat charge a pretty penny for the real thing! However, signing up as a Red Hat developer can be done entirely free of charge… and getting your mitts on it after that is a piece of cake (and costs precisely nothing at all 🙂 )

On to the obvious question: does Atlas work to make Oracle 12cR1 and 12cR2 installations on this new Red Hat version as simple as it did for earlier ones? Absolutely:

The article describing how to do it still holds true without any alteration or update being necessary, too.

Elementary OS & 12cR2

Last of the Ubuntu-based distros to be tested with the new Younes Fix, Elementary OS is one of my least favourite distros, but still manages (somehow!) tenth place on Distrowatch‘s ranking list. It has inched up a version increment, too, since I first wrote about it and now stands at version 0.4.1, instead of 0.4. Like all the other distros posted about today, it now copes with a 12c Release 2 install via Atlas well:

Zorin & Oracle 12cR2

Another tip to the Younes Fix: Oracle 12cR2 runs fine on the latest release of Zorin:

Zorin bumped its version up from 12.0 to 12.1 way back in February 2017: this is the first time I used the newer version to test Atlas on, since Zorin isn’t exactly on my radar as a daily driver of Linux usage! On the other hand, it’s currently listed 9th-most popular distro, according to Distrowatch. Happily, therefore, all is well with both Atlas and Oracle 12cR2 on the newer platform, as you can see.

 

Peppermint & Oracle 12cR2

Thanks to the Younes Fix, Oracle 12c Release 2 installs nicely on Peppermint, one of the more niche Linux distros Atlas works on!

I hadn’t noticed that Peppermint itself has had a version increment: it’s now up to version 8 (from the original 7.something). Happily, Atlas makes light work of even the new version:

As it turns out, Peppermint 8 was released back in May 2017. I was rather distracted at the time, which is why I missed it.

I can’t say it’s an improvement on version 7: visually, it’s now pretty ghastly out-of-the-box. It also seems to have tumbled down the distrowatch popularity listings: Atlas’ criterion for including a distro or not was that it had to be in the top 20 of distrowatch’s listing. It was back in December 2016 when Atlas was first devised; right now it’s sitting at 28th on the list and going downwards…

Caught Up – Atlas Fixed!

I claim absolutely no credit for this, but a reader called Younes El-karama has been in touch to offer additions to the fixup script which Atlas sometimes creates when preparing for Oracle 12cR2 installations onto assorted distros, such as Ubuntu, Mint, Peppermint and so on.

Younes originally did this specifically to make Atlas work properly for 12cR2 on Linux Mint. I am not entirely sure if he realised, however, that his work actually makes Atlas function properly for 12cR2 on any Ubuntu-based distro… but he’s clearly a smart guy, so I suspect he did 🙂

The short version is, anyway, that thanks to Younes, the list of which distros can have Atlas help get 12c Release 2 running on them, which I mentioned in a previous post, now looks like this:

Debian 8.2+ ............................ Works fine
Linux Mint 18+ ......................... Works fine
Mint Debian Edition 2+ ................. Works fine
Red Hat ES 7.0+ ........................ Works fine
Scientific Linux 7.0+ .................. Works fine
CentOS 7.0+ ............................ Works fine
OpenSuse Leap 42+ ...................... Works fine
Antergos  2016.11+ ..................... Works fine
elementary OS 0.4+ ..................... Works fine
Mageia 5+ .............................. Works fine
Korora 25+ ............................. Works fine
Zorin Core 12 .......................... Works fine
Ubuntu 16+ ............................. Works fine
Manjaro 15+ ............................ Works fine 
Fedora 23+ ............................. Works fine (*)
Peppermint Linux 7+ .................... Works fine
GeckoLinux Static 422+ ................. Works fine
Chapeau Linux 24+ ...................... Works fine
PCLinuxOS 2016+ ........................ Works fine

That is, Atlas works fine on getting 12c Release 2 installed on all its target distros. There’s just one exception, indicated by that asterisk: Fedora 26 wasn’t around at the time I prepared the original list …and it still doesn’t work as yet. Younes’ fix doesn’t help there, since Oracle 12c R1 and R2 both compile fine on it, but then fail to create a database. The Younes Fix as I’ve taken to calling it, on the other hand, solves a compilation problem that bedevilled all Ubuntu-based distros when trying to compile Oracle 12c Release 2 binaries.

To be clear, the Oracle 12c Release 2 linking phase still fails on all the Ubuntu-based distros, but Atlas knows this will happen and therefore creates a fixup.sh script in your oracle user’s Documents directory, just as it has always done. The Younes Fix, however, means that the script contains more lines in it than before. It’s those extra lines which make a 12c R2 installation possible:

So, my abundant thanks to Younes, and he gets the appropriate credit at the top of the Atlas scripts. It is nice to see open source collaboration working so well! Atlas itself is now bumped to version 1.5 in consequence; the new version is automatically downloaded when you do the standard Atlas stuff:

wget http://bit.do/dizatlas -O atlas.sh
chmod +x atlas.sh

Everything else remains as was described in the original documentation for the relevant distros (Ubuntu, Zorin, Elementary OS, Peppermint and Mint).

Atlas and Mint 18.2

It is obviously the season for assorted Linux distros to release new versions. Like busses, you wait a long time with nothing much happening -and then four or more come along at once!

On July 2nd, it was the turn of Linux Mint to release a new version, code-named Sonya, numbered 18.2.

It’s based on Ubuntu 16.04, which means it suffers from the usual problems that beset any Ubuntu-based distro when trying to install Oracle 12c Release 2… basically, nothing works at all! However, installing and using 12c Release 1 is fine.

Nothing about Atlas therefore has changed: it can be used as-is to achieve simpler 12cR1 installs on the new distro version:

Incidentally, I am still trying to work out what is going wrong with Ubuntu (and Ubuntu-based!) distros and 12c Release 2. I am not having much luck tracking it down, though. If anyone has input they’d care to offer, I’m all ears!