Timing…

If the secret of comedy is timing, then Oracle must be the funniest corporation around!

With less than 24 hours to go before my flight back to the UK, they make 12c Release 2 available for general use.

Naturally, all my PCs and servers are packed, so I only have a feeble airplane-ready spare to do anything on. I have managed a 12cR2 install using Atlas on CentOS 7, so I can at least confirm the new version doesn’t really change anything much as far as the installation process is concerned and hardly anything about Atlas needs to be modified to deal with it. But I haven’t tested all the other distros Atlas claims to work with, so I’m not releasing a 12cR2-ready version of Atlas yet. First order of business when I reach Blighty’s shores, I guess.

The major drama as far as 12cR2 is concerned, from my point of view, is that the EMP table doesn’t exist by default any more 🙁 (but rdbms/admin/utlsampl.sql will create it if needed, as it has always done). A sad day indeed, then.

Plus there are thunderstorms forecast for Sydney tomorrow. It’ll be a bumpy take-off…

A Universal Pre-Installer

It is the new year, and nearly my birthday. So I thought I would treat myself to a streamlined and modular way of installing Oracle 12c onto practically any Linux distro I fancied.

Say ‘hi’ to Atlas, a single script that shoulders the burden of doing all the preparatory work needed to get Oracle running nicely.

No matter what distro you’re running, you just download Atlas; you chmod it to make it executable, and then you run it. It sorts out everything else after that for you.

Atlas therefore replaces the menagerie of per-distro scripts I developed over the past year (eg, Kirk for CentOS; Mandela for Ubuntu; Mercury for Manjaro and so on). Where those per-distro scripts worked to get 11g installed, I’ll keep them (because Atlas is 12c-only), though I won’t maintain them further. But if the distro-specific script only did 12c, it now disappears: Atlas is its complete functional replacement.

I’ve put together a landing page, explaining what specific distros Atlas has been tested with (at the last count somewhere north of 20) and the details of how it works and how to use it.

Whilst I’ve got the thing working on all distros mentioned on that page, distro-specific documentation will take a bit of time to arrive. That for Debian is already done. The others are coming, hopefully before the week is out.