Atlas and 12cR2

Continuing the saga of “catching up” with software developments whilst I was en route to the UK from Australia, the question next to be addressed is simply: does Atlas work to allow Oracle 12c Release 2 to be installed onto the many and various distros it claims to support.

The answer is a bit mixed, I’m afraid!

First thing to say: I deliberately coded Atlas to specifically declare 12cR2 ‘didn’t work yet’ when I first released it. So, for it to work for 12cR2 at all, that bit of code has to be removed -and that means Atlas straightaway gets bumped to version 1.2.

Once that code has gone, the good news is that Atlas will successfully help 12cR2 be installed on the majority of the distros it works with (15 out of 19, as it happens). But the bad news is that if your distro is Ubuntu or even just Ubuntu-based, then the linking phase of the Oracle 12c Release 2 installation fails irreparably after Atlas has been run.

The complete list of distros and their results with Atlas for 12c Release 2 is therefore as follows:

Debian 8.2+ ............................ Works fine
Linux Mint 18+ ......................... Fails
Mint Debian Edition 2+ ................. Works fine
Red Hat ES 7.0+ ........................ Works fine
Scientific Linux 7.0+ .................. Works fine
CentOS 7.0+ ............................ Works fine
OpenSuse Leap 42+ ...................... Works fine
Antergos  2016.11+ ..................... Works fine
elementary OS 0.4+ ..................... Fails
Mageia 5+ .............................. Works fine
Korora 25+ ............................. Works fine
Zorin Core 12 .......................... Fails
Ubuntu 16+ ............................. Fails
Manjaro 15+ ............................ Works fine 
Fedora 23+ ............................. Works fine
Peppermint Linux 7+ .................... Fails
GeckoLinux Static 422+ ................. Works fine
Chapeau Linux 24+ ...................... Works fine
PCLinuxOS 2016+ ........................ Works fine

As I say, the pattern is pretty obvious and I suspect the problem is that the gcc versioning tricks I had to pull to get 12cR1 to compile properly on any Ubuntu-based distro back in January are now the cause of woes for 12cR2. The failure always manifests itself in the following manner:

There’s no recovering from that as yet, but I hope to get it sorted within the week.

On the other hand, for any distro listed as working fine in the above list, you can expect the usual plain sailing:

That’s specifically Oracle 12.2.0.1 running on GeckoLinux, which is a spin of openSUSE Tumbleweed, but you get the same outcome for all non-Ubuntu distros.

Whilst testing all this, I discovered a couple of distros which had incremented their version strings since January (Manjaro, for instance, now reports itself as version ’17.something’, so the part of Atlas where it checked for version strings containing the numbers 15 or 16 obviously needed updating). Those sorts of versioning updates are now also included in Atlas 1.2.

There is very little updating of the Atlas doco to do, happily. For a start, you will obtain the new Atlas version just by running exactly the same wget command as was previously documented: the URL alias simply points to the latest version, but the URL itself doesn’t change.

When you install Oracle 12cR2 onto any of these non-standard distros (except the RHCSL ones, of course), you will get this dire-looking warning:

It’s better than the 12cR1 equivalent, which was to say ‘your system is inadequate’! Anyway, for all the distros for which Atlas works at all, it’s perfectly OK to say ‘yes, I want to continue’. The installation will succeed anyway.

Have fun… and wish me luck whilst battling with Ubuntu later this week 🙂

Atlas, Ubuntu 17 and 12cR1

As I mentioned last post, one major issue that has arisen since I left Australia is this: does Atlas run on the freshly-released Ubuntu 17.04 to make Oracle 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2) installations a piece of cake? It was working fine on 16.04 and 16.10; but would things break with the fresh 17.04 release?

Here’s the answer:

To be fair, I had to alter the Atlas script in one tiny respect: it originally tested for the existence of ’16’ as one component of the distro’s version string. That was obviously a bit restrictive! I’ve now added ’17’ as a test, too… and that means Atlas’s version bumps to 1.1.

You don’t need to do anything different than was originally documented, though: the ‘wget http://bit.do/dizatlas -O atlas.sh‘ instruction works as it always did. It’s just that it now downloads the newer Atlas script instead of the original.

Timing…

If the secret of comedy is timing, then Oracle must be the funniest corporation around!

With less than 24 hours to go before my flight back to the UK, they make 12c Release 2 available for general use.

Naturally, all my PCs and servers are packed, so I only have a feeble airplane-ready spare to do anything on. I have managed a 12cR2 install using Atlas on CentOS 7, so I can at least confirm the new version doesn’t really change anything much as far as the installation process is concerned and hardly anything about Atlas needs to be modified to deal with it. But I haven’t tested all the other distros Atlas claims to work with, so I’m not releasing a 12cR2-ready version of Atlas yet. First order of business when I reach Blighty’s shores, I guess.

The major drama as far as 12cR2 is concerned, from my point of view, is that the EMP table doesn’t exist by default any more 🙁 (but rdbms/admin/utlsampl.sql will create it if needed, as it has always done). A sad day indeed, then.

Plus there are thunderstorms forecast for Sydney tomorrow. It’ll be a bumpy take-off…

A Universal Pre-Installer

It is the new year, and nearly my birthday. So I thought I would treat myself to a streamlined and modular way of installing Oracle 12c onto practically any Linux distro I fancied.

Say ‘hi’ to Atlas, a single script that shoulders the burden of doing all the preparatory work needed to get Oracle running nicely.

No matter what distro you’re running, you just download Atlas; you chmod it to make it executable, and then you run it. It sorts out everything else after that for you.

Atlas therefore replaces the menagerie of per-distro scripts I developed over the past year (eg, Kirk for CentOS; Mandela for Ubuntu; Mercury for Manjaro and so on). Where those per-distro scripts worked to get 11g installed, I’ll keep them (because Atlas is 12c-only), though I won’t maintain them further. But if the distro-specific script only did 12c, it now disappears: Atlas is its complete functional replacement.

I’ve put together a landing page, explaining what specific distros Atlas has been tested with (at the last count somewhere north of 20) and the details of how it works and how to use it.

Whilst I’ve got the thing working on all distros mentioned on that page, distro-specific documentation will take a bit of time to arrive. That for Debian is already done. The others are coming, hopefully before the week is out.